Tag Archives: lookbook

Lookbook #6: Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

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I own a handful of books on typography and while they’re educational and inspiring, the overall design isn’t all that beautiful. They say that you shouldn’t judge a book by its cover but for a designer, that’s easier said than done.

While the titles on my bookshelf covered the history of typography, there weren’t many images. I wanted to see more visuals of type specimens and the effects history and design trends had on typography as a whole. I knew that there had to be some meatier books out there that covered what I was looking for.

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

Then, I discovered Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles (try saying that 10 times fast!) and it was perfect. Comprised of two volumes, this book is a visual masterpiece. The first book covers pre-20th century type specimens while the second covers 1900 through the mid 20th century.

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles

Weighing in at 720 pages, this book expertly traces the history of the printed letterform and has snippets from signs, books, catalogs and more. In my opinion, it’s a total must-have.

Nubby Twiglet | Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles


Featured title: Type. A Visual History of Typefaces & Graphic Styles
Photos and scans: Shauna Haider

Lookbook #5: Madonna NYC83

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

I have a longstanding love of Madonna (just scroll to the end of this post to see how long!) and when I first spotted this book in Melbourne, I knew it had to be mine.

It’s a gritty yet glam walk down memory lane beginning in May of 1983 when photographer Richard Corman got a call from his mother who was casting for a Scorcese film. Over the phone, she told Richard of a woman she’d just met. “She’s an original! I’ve never met anyone like her!”

Richard obliged his mother’s wishes and followed Madonna across the Lower East Side and later to some of her earliest gigs. Of this time in Madonna’s career, he said, “She was amazing, but she was also a part of a movement of creativity where the more you pushed, the more it yielded — and there were so many young artists all pushing at once.”

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Truthfully, these photos and scans just can’t do the book full justice — it’s beautiful. The cover of the book resembles a tightly wrapped canvas and is a piece of art in its own right (I keep my copy sitting out in my office).

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

Back on the subject of my longstanding love of all things Madonna, it all started around 1985. After preschool, I’d hang out with my teenage cousin Tracy and to kill time, we’d play dress-up. She had all the cool belts, bandanas, rubber bracelets and black layers. I was always a willing subject to impersonate Madonna!

Nubby Twiglet | Madonna NYC83 Book

“This is an invasion of privacy! Why won’t the paparazzi leave me alone?! Oh sorry…it’s just you again, Aunt Shannon.” Huge props to my aunt who always had a camera handy and captured the drama of my childhood!


Featured title: Richard Corman: Madonna NYC 83
Photos and scans: Shauna Haider
Check out even more Look Book columns here.

Lookbook #4: The Print Revolution

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The Print Revolution explores how fashion designers have put the new technology of digital printing to use. Covering a wide array of designers from new to established, the book catalogs their inspiring results.

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Traditionally, silk-screen printing was the standard method of applying patterns onto apparel but it could add substantial cost to the product since each color required a separate screen. Because of this, multi-hued patterns were limited to higher-end collections.

With digital printing, the process works in a similar manner that an inkjet printer would, meaning that the complexity and scale of patterns is now unlimited. It’s pretty amazing to see how this technology has rapidly opened the floodgates for designers of all sizes to apply surface patterns to their apparel.


The Print Revolution was provided courtesy of Gingko Press. All opinions are my own.

Lookbook #3: It Is Beautiful…Then Gone

Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone

Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone

Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone

Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone

Ages ago, I shared a few choice visuals from one of my favorite books, It Is Beautiful…Then Gone but not enough to do it justice. This book is one that I go back to repeatedly because it’s mostly collage-based but has a strong sense of design weaving throughout its pages. I made collages long before I was a designer and this book reminds me of why I love it so much.

A lot of the work here was produced in the early 90s as the author struggled to find his footing in art school. The transition from creating design by hand to using computers was in full swing. Instead of fully embracing the clumsy computers, he revived many of his school’s forgotten relics including the darkroom and wove together his own unique style.

Though Venezky’s style has visible design roots, the hand-done elements are obvious and give his work dimension — you can see the photocopied pieces and the layers of the overlapping images. His work is a reminder that we don’t have to be totally dependent on computers to create a layout and that sometimes, it’s necessary to step away to push our personal boundaries.

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Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone

Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone

Nubby Twiglet | Lookbook: It Is Beautiful...Then Gone


Featured book: It Is Beautiful…Then Goneby Martin Venezky.
Check out more Lookbook columns here.

Lookbook #2: Excess: Fashion And The Underground In The 80s

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Lookbook: Excess

In 2004, I was walking through Powell’s Books and spotted Excess: Fashion And The Underground In The 80s. I bought it on the spot.

Lookbook: Excess

The book features a tightly edited collection of hundreds of fashion photos ranging from the runway to the club scene along with countless essays on the role fashion played in 80s culture, from music to movies (with coverage of everything from Blade Runner to Wall Street).

Lookbook: Excess

The interesting slant is that while 80s fashion as a whole is covered in depth, there is a particular focus on Italian fashion (the publisher is Italian). Italian designers played a huge role in the transition to a more structured, sculptural look and a lot of their work is woven throughout the book across many obscure ads and magazine covers.

Lookbook: Excess

Lookbook: Excess

It’s always fascinating to see the key trends of a decade and how art, politics, movies and music intersected to influence it all.

This book does a great job of navigating the complicated world of 80s fashion (with everything from Armani powersuits to New Romantic looks getting starring roles) while retaining a diplomatic tone — there are no clichés, only a realistic glance back at how things were.

Lookbook: Excess


Featured book: Excess: Fashion And The Underground In The 80s

Lookbook #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

There are some books I repeatedly come back to no matter how many times I’ve flipped through their pages — this new column, Lookbook, is dedicated to them. Even though I spend most of my days absorbed in everything digital, I’ve always loved books and the escape they provide. While everyone else is adding titles to their iPads and Kindles, I’m surfing Amazon, looking for a new print fix.

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Kate Spade’s Things We Love was released earlier this year as a nod to the brand’s 20th anniversary. In the year following up to its release, I’d seen the super-limited teaser online many times but sadly, this mini book wasn’t available to the public.

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Then, in January, the full length edition was released and at 240 pages, was much more extensive than the mini version had let on. Six months after its arrival in my office, I’m still reaching for it constantly.

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Brimming with 20 chapters of things the creative team at Kate Spade adores (including the color red and handwritten notes), this visual diary perfectly sums up the quirkiness of the brand through quotes, photos, film stills and curated layouts of knick-knacks.

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Look Book #1: Things We Love by Kate Spade

Things We Love is bound to get your creative juices flowing and remind you that even the smallest things in life are worthwhile of a celebration.


Images: Scanned from Things We Love.