Tag Archives: Graphic Design

Getting Creative with Very Very V

Nubby Twiglet | Getting Creative with Very Very V

As this year winds down, there’s one personal project I’m extra excited about: Very Very V. It’s turned into something much bigger than a course and is a chance to explore design concepts for my ideal vision of a brand.

When Erika and I started working on this business a year ago, it was because we were both seeking a creative outlet not attached to a dollar amount, client expectations or a deadline.

Nubby Twiglet | Getting Creative with Very Very V

We wondered: what would happen if we threw out the pressure of delivering content by a certain date and instead, experimented like style-obsessed mad scientists who worshipped Diana Vreeland?

We took our time, allowed ideas to blossom and in the meantime, began sharing personal anecdotes on our mailing list along with black, red and pink-filled graphics over on Instagram.

Nubby Twiglet | Getting Creative with Very Very V

Each week, VVV blossoms bit by bit and we’ve moved beyond just a course. That will happen eventually but there’s talks of something so much bigger than just that: a community — a place for women who want to hone their voice and visuals. Over time, there will be products. This is just the beginning.

Nubby Twiglet | Getting Creative with Very Very V

As Very Very V continues to grow, I hope it inspires women to tell their stories honestly and fully, dress exactly the way they want, express themselves visually and be unafraid to go big.

VVV_VROOM_MOCKUP_3

If you want to keep up with VVV, you can join the mailing list and grab Vroom, a free style guide with stories to get you inspired right here.

More Than a Pretty Picture: The Story Behind the Cover

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine Issue 11

Good design is great but when there’s a great story behind it, that layer of depth makes it even better.

This cover Rock n Roll Bride is my favorite yet because of the story inside. Of course, the couple is beautiful and photogenic. What you can’t see is that the bride, Jaquie had been wheelchair-bound for the 8 years prior to her wedding day after a spinal cord injury left her paralyzed from the chest down.

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine Issue 11

After a year dedicated to intense physical therapy and countless hours spent at the gym, she surprised the audience at her ceremony by not only walking down the aisle but dancing the night away. As my designer Sam and I were laying out the cover, I thought a lot about how too many magazines focus on putting models and unattainable ideals on their covers instead of real people with amazing stories that can inspire us to strive for more in our own lives.

When I read an article or blog post, I want the grit, I want the comeback story and I want the passion. I want to feel like maybe the seemingly impossible is somehow possible, that whatever setback there is can be overcome, even when I’ve heard otherwise.

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine Issue 11

The timing of this cover really hit home because my cousin’s surgery had complications and he hasn’t been able to walk since. It’s been a very difficult time and this cover and story is a reminder that anything is possible. This year has been a tough one for many people I know and perhaps you, too. Working on a magazine dedicated to real weddings and love always leaves me feeling good about those happy moments in the world.

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine Issue 11

If you’d like to pick up a copy of issue 11, you can have it shipped straight to your doorstep!

This post is a reminder that sometimes, all you need is love.

Create a Seamless Client Experience with Project Prescription for Photographers

Nubby Twiglet | Project Prescription Photography

Photographers, I’ve heard you loud and clear: you need a process that works, too.

The one thing I know for sure after freelancing for a decade is that earning a living as a creative becomes easier when you have a process in place that you believe in and can easily relay to your clients. The more they understand about how you work, the easier it becomes for them to commit to working with you — because quite simply, it alleviates the fear of the unknown.

Most creative school programs teach you how to produce epic, jaw dropping work but the trade-off is that they don’t teach you how to be a good businessperson. And, as much as creativity matters, it’s not enough on its own to pay the bills.

Nubby Twiglet | Project Prescription Photography

The Backstory

Today I want to share a new version of Project Prescription with you, specifically designed for photographers.

As you probably know by now, Project Prescription is a set of customizable documents I originally created with Paul Jarvis earlier this year to help graphic designers take the guesswork out of creating a client process, from beginning to finish.

Creating this offering seemed like a no-brainer because I’d struggled so much in the beginning of my career conveying my worth to potential clients and it held me back big time. Because I didn’t know how to explain the strategy and steps behind what I did, I wasn’t able to charge livable rates and lacked confidence in presenting the work I produced.

After years of trial and error, I created my own process and perfected it across hundreds of client projects. Project Prescription for Designers is based on the processes both Paul and I use on a daily basis to run our respective studios.

Shortly after launching Project Prescription for Designers, Paul I started receiving emails from other creatives who were also struggling to figure out a process that worked. What we didn’t expect were the emails we received from another audience altogether: photographers.

Nubby Twiglet | Project Prescription Photography

Project Prescription for Photographers

Luke Copping is a photographer I admire immensely. He was one of my first-ever clients back in 2009 and we’ve built out dozens of projects together in the years since. I admire his creative work, his dedication to the photography industry as a whole and his willingness to help other photographers understand how to build viable businesses.

What sets Luke apart from his peers is that he isn’t just a photographer — he is a process fanatic. Luke has every step of his creative process precisely documented and knows how to clearly communicate to his clients how he works and how they’ll benefit directly from that work. As a professional that not only manages his own studio but is often traveling to remote sets for extended periods of time, he has to be extremely organized.

For Paul and I, partnering with Luke to create Project Prescription Photography made perfect sense. After years in the trenches working directly with professional clients, he knows what it takes to produce stunning images. But, like any photographer will tell you, snapping the perfect shot is just one piece of the overall puzzle. There are contracts, shot lists, questionnaires and so much more that happen before that even takes place.

Nubby Twiglet | Project Prescription Photography

What’s Included

Project Prescription Photography includes the following:

• 20 fully customizable process documents broken into 4 areas including Onboarding, Pre-Production, The Shoot and Post-Production & Delivery (read all the descriptions here).

• InDesign and Google Doc file formats so you can use whichever software you’re most comfortable with.

• U.S. sizing (8.5 x 11) and European sizing (A4) for every document.

• A screencast that explains how to quickly customize your documents in InDesign including changing out the logos, colors and fonts.

Project Prescription Photography is available at a discounted launch price of $88.00 for this week only. After that, it will return to its regular price of $108.00.

Nubby Twiglet | Project Prescription Photography

Whether you’re a beginning photographer looking to build a process from scratch or a seasoned photographer interested in perfecting your process, Project Prescription Photography makes it easy to customize your documents and get back to what you’re most passionate about — your work.

If you have any questions, let me know in the comments. Thanks for reading!

P.S. If you’re interested in learning more about Luke’s background and how having a process transformed his own career, you can read more about his experiences right here.

Rock n Roll Bride Issue 9 On Sale Now!

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine

Issue 9 of Rock n Roll Bride Magazine just went on sale and though I haven’t had a chance to do a full design recap, I wanted to give a shout-out to Kat because I think this issue is the best one yet.

Though I’ve always been an admirer of magazines and editorial design, it’s not until my studio started working on one that I realized just how much work goes into sourcing original content and putting together each issue.

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine

I admire people who come up with an idea, especially when it’s a passion project that doesn’t necessarily pay the bills right away and run with it, nurture it and grow it into something amazing. I’ve watched Kat take this magazine concept from a 40 page freebie she handed out at wedding fairs 5 years ago to a full-blown glossy on newsstands.

Stories like this remind me to keep going with my own projects, even when things get hard or burnout hits. We’ve all been there…but it’s when we push through those moments that something great can transpire.

The covers of magazines are always the hardest part to get right and I absolutely love this couple photographed by Dale Weeks. They had an entirely vegan wedding, her beautiful sequin dress was custom-made after the first dress didn’t work (it’s never too late to change things up!)….and they met on Myspace 10 years ago! So good!

Nubby Twiglet | Rock n Roll Bride Magazine

Anyway, you can pick up an issue in person at grocery stores and newsstands across the UK or order it from anywhere in the world here.

Thanks for your support!

Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

Every year around this time, Designer Vaca opens up for registration and since this is usually the only design-related event I attend all year, I want my portfolio to be updated and looking as polished as possible. I registered last week and it’s always a good kick in the ass to get things in shape!

Portfolios are a popular search term and I can see why — as creative business owners, we need them to get more work! I made some updates to the Branch portfolio over the weekend and hope these quick and easy tips get you inspired as you’re working on yours.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

1. Larger Images

Three years ago when I launched my portfolio, the sizing of images was a lot smaller. My early projects were sized at 1000 pixels wide but with retina displays becoming more common, I noticed my images weren’t as crisp as they could be. I just resized every project in my portfolio up to 1800 pixels wide in the hopes that even though they may take a touch longer to upload, I won’t have to redo any projects for the foreseeable future. Save yourself time by going bigger now!

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

2. Introduction Graphics

One thing my portfolio was lacking was a sense of cohesion from project to project since the work spanned over such a long period of time. I just made an additional graphic for the beginning of each project with an intro that briefly sums up the brand. Whether you’re doing a digital or print portfolio, an introduction is a simple way to add whitespace and let the design work breathe.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

3. New Color Swatches

In the past, I used various charts to show a brand’s colors within a project but once again, these were all over the place style-wise. After doing some research, I really liked the way Brand Minute showed colors with Pantone-inspired swatches so I’ve switched over to this style. Whichever way works for you, make it a consistent, signature element from project to project.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

4. Better Mockups

Over the last year, mockups have gotten much better. The detail these days is incredibly realistic, whether you’re showing a new line of t-shirts, beauty products or stationery. I use mockups to showcase finished projects because they help me stay consistent, repeating certain visual elements, colors and lighting styles throughout the graphics. I am a fan of Pixeden but also buy a lot of pieces off Creative Market, like this set I used to create visuals for Kate’s new essential oils.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: 5 Tips to Update Your Design Portfolio

5. More Flat Lays

Showing a logo only gives the viewer so much information about a project — seeing the pieces in use and how the varying elements work together really helps them understand the breadth of your work. These can be time consuming but well worth it to break up the simpler images and increase visual interest. I like pulling elements in from various mockup sets and arranging them in new configurations so nothing feels too canned. The key is to make these scenes your own.


As creatives, it’s our jobs to show and explain to potential clients what we can do — and our portfolios are a look into not just what we’ve done but what we want more of in the future.

Sometimes, I feel that putting together a portfolio is the hardest project I’ve ever done. Do you, as well? Doing work for yourself always somehow feels more monumental and stressful, doesn’t it?

Making the time is hard — it means stepping away from something you enjoy and investing it towards your business, with no guarantee of a return. But, as more of the right clients begin to roll in, it is always worth it when you’re able to take on more of the work you enjoy.

Your turn: Do you have any portfolio questions? Let me know in the comments!
Featured project: Kate Eckman by We Are Branch.

Creative Chronicles: Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Q: I’m reaching out because I feel stuck in my career. When I graduated with a design degree, I was hired by a company that I’ve now been with for  7 years and I’m ready to move on. I have applied for Art Director positions at many companies with no luck so far. It seems like I’m getting a lot of no’s instead of a yes but I don’t believe in giving up so I’m wondering what else I can do. Maybe my portfolio needs a big improvement? I’m willing to do whatever it takes.


A. To this very day, the most common questions that land in my inbox relate to portfolios and landing a job. And trust me — I get it. As a designer, your portfolio is the link to your next big opportunity. Have you ever heard of that saying, “Show, don’t tell?” Well, a portfolio does exactly that. There’s only so much you can say about your accomplishments and the notable clients you’ve worked with. Showing your interviewer actual outcomes is the proof.

Though I’ve written a handful of portfolio-related articles in the past, today’s is a little different since the writer isn’t a freshly graduating student but someone with years of professional experience looking to transition out of her current role and into a new company.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Without ado, here are 10 pieces of advice to succeed when you’re prepping for an interview for a design position:

1. Show relevant work

This is a big one. Think about the company and the industry it is in. What types of projects do you have in your arsenal that would be a good fit? Once you’ve been working professionally for a few years, chances are that you’ve weeded out most of your school projects and have a mix of both corporate and smaller freelance projects to share. Remember that your interviewers have a limited amount of time and usually, there’s no need to share more than 6 to 10 projects. So, how can you make the most impact?

When I was looking for a full-time job a few years back before starting Branch, my previous position had been mostly production work but I was interviewing for a spot on a brand team. Because of this, I left most of the work from my previous employer out and showed mostly branding projects I’d personally completed with freelance clients since these were more relevant. If you do have a project you’re proud of and want to include but it’s not super relevant to the position, just make sure you have a really good story to go with it!

2. Self-initiated projects are fair game

I know how hard it can be getting the right types of projects you want during the first few years of your career. If you don’t feel that you have the ideal mix to share with a potential employer, that’s totally fair. I felt that way for a long time, too but the easiest way around that is to create a project or two for your ideal fantasy client.

This isn’t misleading as long as you’re clear that it’s self-initiated and if anything, it’s a strength to be able to show that you took the initiative to complete a large-scale project on your own time…and finished it! My brother interviewed at Nike years ago and though he didn’t have a lot of work that tied into the job he wanted at the time, he designed his own dream shoe and included it at the end of his portfolio. He got the job!

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

4. Keep descriptions short and sweet

For the most part, designers have a harder time writing than they do putting together visuals and oh boy, do I get stuck when describing my own projects and the outcome! The thing to remember is that you really don’t need more than 3 sentences max to get your point across. If you’re struggling big time with getting to the point and keeping your descriptions short and snappy, I’d recommend hiring a copywriter. It’s worth its weight in gold to have a second set of eyes that can tighten up your writing.

5. Do your homework

When I think back to the best interviews I ever had, yes, my portfolio mattered, but equally important was having a personal connection to the company through a story I could share. When I interviewed for my first-ever design job, I was familiar with the studio’s work and style because I’d attended many of their art openings and parties so it was easy to make them feel like I already fit in.

Be friendly, sign up to newsletters and follow your dream company on social media. The more integrated into their world you are before the interview, the easier it will be to make a great impression. My current employee, Samantha had been following this blog and knew about key Branch projects I’d shared on social media so when she interviewed with me last year, I felt like she was already familiar with our culture and shared common interests. I hired her by the end of our interview because she felt like the perfect fit — I could sense that her integration would be seamless.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

6. Conduct market research

This is one of my favorite pastimes! Some people would call this stalking (ha!) but hey, I look at it a little differently —everything you need to know about a company is already out there. Take some time to read through your potential employer’s website, scan their social media accounts and get familiar with some of their notable projects and accolades. What are they most proud of? If they list employees on their website, get a feel for the kinds of work they personally produce. Look at as many portfolios as possible to find ways you can improve — because I have news for you — your portfolio is never really done! Preparation is key for any interview and the more you know, the better chance you have for sealing the deal.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

7. Mock it up

One thing I’ve learned from redoing my own portfolio dozens of times is that the work you show can always be presented better. There’s always room for improvement and a lot of that has to do with mockups. I am a big fan of mockups because I don’t always have hard copies of printed materials from projects (90% of Branch clients are remote) and also, I don’t have pro-level photo equipment to consistently capture the work I do have on-hand. Mocking up your work allows you to present your ideal scenario of the outcome of a project and create a level of consistency with backgrounds and lighting.

If you need some fantastic, free mockups to get started, I highly recommend Graphic Burger. And, if you have a bit more of a budget and need very specific items, give Pixeden a try.

8. Simple is best

I know it’s hard to avoid because as designers, we’re naturally overachievers, obsessing over the tiniest details to built the best portfolio ever but perfectionism can also paralyze you. When in doubt, keep things simple. White space speaks volumes about your confidence as a designer. Allowing your work to breathe instead of overwhelm is key. Let your crisp, concise visuals and short and sweet descriptions placed on white backgrounds do the talking.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

9. Always send a thank you

If you truly want the job, always follow up the same day with a short but specific thank you message. While actual thank you cards are nice, it’s important to be immediate with this step so I’d recommend an email. Reiterate that you appreciate the interviewer taking time out of their busy schedule to meet with you, include one specific fact about the company that stood out in the interview (it shows that you care AND that you were paying attention!) and finally, let them know you think you’re the ideal fit and are ready for the next steps. You can definitely be forward and confident without coming across as pushy.

10. In the meantime, gain experience

If your dream job doesn’t pan out right away, that’s okay. I know it’s easy to say that but I speak from experience. In 2009, I interviewed at a studio I’d always wanted to work at. While the interview went well, they didn’t feel that I had enough experience. I’d only been out of school for a year and while I showed potential, they needed a more senior-level designer. Instead of getting upset, I threw myself into freelancing at every studio I possibly could.

In 2012, an unexpected email landed in my inbox from that same company. What I thought was a quick informational interview morphed into a meeting with the owner and by that night, I had an offer letter in-hand. Was it worth the wait? Absolutely. I was able to jump in with both feet and all that additional experience I’d gained was priceless.

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Nubby Twiglet | Creative Chronicles: Use Your Portfolio to Land Your Ideal Job

Playing the waiting game is hard and building out a portfolio is a monumental task but all that preparation eventually pays off. You’ve got this — sometimes it just takes awhile to get what you want.

If hunting for a design job is something that interests you but you need a boost, I’m working with career strategist Ellen Fondiler and digital product mastermind Paul Jarvis to create Future So Bright, a new course dedicated to helping designers find their dream jobs. The best part is, this course will have a digital portfolio and resume template included. We’re launching later this Summer and I can’t wait to share more!

In the meantime, let me know if you have any portfolio questions in the comments. Always happy to help!


Featured work: We Are Branch.

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

Hi, I’ve missed you guys a ton! It’s been a very, very full month around here with family, work, travel and everything in-between.

When I’ve had some time to reflect, I start realizing how much I haven’t shared with you about what types of creative projects I’m working on on a daily basis, even though that’s what I spend the majority of my time doing.

The last year in particular has been pretty much nonstop at Branch and I’m embarrassed to admit that some of the projects we finished last year (or even before that!) are still waiting to be shared.

At this point, as soon as a project wraps, I deliver the assets, close it out and drop it into the Archive folder…only to discover I never shared it a few months down the road. Rinse and repeat…like 20 times.

There’s a lot to catch up on and I know it’s now or never — but in the meantime, I wanted to give you a peek at some of them. I’m lucky to spend my days working with an amazing roster of clients who let me have a ton of freedom to create cool stuff for them. Instead of keeping everything hidden away, it’s time to share and give a bunch of them a shout-out!

Here we go!

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

0. Luke Copping Newsprint Promo (top): We took Luke’s super polished images and applied them to newsprint for a really cool, analog feel. I have a copy sitting in my office that I still need to share but you can check it out here.

1. Radical Self Love Coven Branding: This is the first (and only!) time I’ve gotten to create a logo with a witch hat. Thank Gala Darling for that one! The logo is for a course all about living a more magical life that you can check out here.

2. Places Soap Branding and Packaging: This has been a massive undertaking over the last 6 months as I created a new brand and packaging system for a travel-inspired soap brand. The packaging has gold foil accents and we just approved the print files yesterday — can’t wait to show you the full line as it rolls out to stores!

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

3. Future So Bright Course: I’ve been working with Ellen Fondiler and another partner to create a course that helps graphic designers land their dream job. I so wish this had existed when I was graduating college and unsure of what my career options were. Hope it instead helps you!

4. Luke Copping Guide: I’ve been working with photographer Luke Copping since 2009 and we’ve created some great stuff together. We just finished this digital Getting Started Guide which is a cross between a portfolio and media kit.

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

5. Kate Eckman Branding and Website: I met Kate last year at our final Blogcademy class and we had an immediate connection — she’s a well-known model and QVC beauty host but literally one of the most down-to-earth ladies I’ve ever met. Her new site and brand is launching next week!

6. SCSD Branding: I can’t say much about this brand yet because it’s still in-progress but it’s super fun with a female focus and a bold color scheme with tropical-inspired accents.

7. Project Prescription: You’ve probably heard me mention this business that I founded with Paul Jarvis and we’ve got some exciting things coming up! We’re relaunching next month with a revamped document bundle including A4 sizing and Google Docs. Sign up to our list for free document samples!

8. TBW Beauty Packaging: I can’t share much about this new line of products yet because it’s in-progress but it will feature perfume sprays made of natural floral essences. So pretty!

9. DQ Branding: This is one of my favorite branding outcomes of all-time but it’s still very much in progress so I can’t share much yet. All I can say is that it involves an eye and rose gold. Yippee!

10. Rock n Roll Bride Magazine: We’ve been designing this alternative wedding magazine for a year now and the content just keeps getting better. The new issue just went on sale and features an epic David Bowie bridal-inspired tribute and lots helpful of advice. Take a look!

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

11. Art Of V Course: This is a side project I’m working on with Erika Lyremark with the goal of teaching women how to be more creative and leverage more of who they are in their brands. It’s something I’ve always wanted to teach because at its core, branding should be relatable and understandable.

12. B Branding and Website: This is still in-progress and is a brand for a new Australian stationery company. We’ve wrapped the branding and print materials and are now hard at work on the website. More soon!

13. Mick Hayes Collateral: I’ve been working with musician Mick Hayes since last year and we’ve been building his brand out to create custom posters, business cards and now, his latest album packaging. It’s so fun to see a brand come together, piece by piece.

14. Bad Witch Workout Branding: This is another brand we recently created for Gala Darling. I’m obsessed!

15. Chutzpah Creative Website: This website has been a huge labor of love based on the branding we did for Chutzpah last year. It just launched last night. Check it out!

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

16. Rock n Roll Bride Magazine: With the redesign of the inside spreads, we also revamped the outside, matching the logo gradient to the bride’s dress and switching up the headline fonts. Grab a copy here!

17. Artifact Creative Recycle Branding and Website: Over the last year, we worked with Portland boutique Artifact to update their branding, signage, print materials and website. Loving the simplicity of this outcome!

18. Gathered Home Branding: This soon-to-be interior design store will blow your mind. They have such a bold, beautiful aesthetic. There are two variations of this branding and a lot of colorful assets I’ll share soon.

19. Ellen Fondiler Branding and Website: Since Ellen’s brand, collateral and website launched, it’s been amazing to watch her grow as a career strategist. I love her no-nonsense advice so much that we’ve partnered up on Future so Bright (above).

Currently 01: A Peek Into The Graphic Design Side Of Life

20. Radical Self Love Coven Workbook: Gala’s first module is going live soon so we just created this 40 page workbook to accompany it. I love the idea of making magic more modern and accessible and this is reflected in the design.

21. B Media Kit: This is a snippet from the media kit of the Australian stationery brand I mentioned above. As soon as the site launches, I’ll share everything! The color combo of green and peach paired with a concrete texture makes me excited!

22. P2 Photography branding: I fell in love with Jenna and Jon of P2 as soon as I connected with them last year — this photography duo is incredibly talented and down to earth. We kept their brand very crisp and cool since they work with a lot of industrial clients.


So there you have it! This is a super condensed version of what I’ve been up to on the creative work front and I hope to share more soon on many of these…and the dozen more I probably forgot. Ha!

Now, it’s your turn.

What are you excited to be working on these days?
A personal project? Freelance work?
Something else?