Tag Archives: Blogging

Hitting The Road: The Blogcademy World Tour!

The Blogcademy World Tour

It’s been a bit of a whirlwind since last August when we announced our first Blogcademy date in New York. I’d never done a workshop before (though it was a huge dream of mine!) so I was cautiously optimistic. But, thanks to the overwhelming enthusiasm and support out there, we realized that announcing one or two dates at a time just wasn’t enough.

Moving forward, we want to be upfront and let you know exactly where we’ll be for the rest of 2013 so that if you’re interested in joining us, you can start making plans right here and now! It’s a bit like when bands go on tour — they give you the rundown of dates before they even hit the road.

With that mentality in mind, today we’re announcing The Blogcademy Word Tour! From now until November, we’ll be trekking across three continents in the quest to teach you everything we know about blogging and hope to see you on the road!

The Blogcademy World Tour

Blogcademy London Graduate Julia!

Tour Schedule

March 30th & 31st
The Cleaners at Ace Hotel

Los Angeles
April 6th & 7th
McCaddenSpace Photo Studio

New York City
June 22nd & 23rd
Rent Patina

June 29th & 30th
Venue TBA

September 7th & 8th
Curtain Road Studios

November 2nd & 3rd
Bleeding Heart Gallery

November 6th & 7th
Lightdrop Studios

November 9th & 10th

You can book your spot on any of these dates right away and for the first three days, we are offering an earlybrid special on all new dates. Additionally, one scholarship spot will be offered for each city. All you need to do is post your entry to our Facebook page at least one month before the date of your chosen event.

The Blogcademy World Tour

Q&A Livestream

At The Blogcademy, we get dozens of blogging questions each week but realize not everyone is able to make it to one of our classes. While it’s important to keep our two-day workshop an in-person event, we’ve been chatting since the beginning, trying to figure out an affordable solution for those of you who still want to participate. Once we all reunite in Portland, we’ll be doing an hour-long LIVE Q&A session and answering as many of your blogging and business questions as possible. The session will be broadcast live but if you can’t watch it then, don’t worry, your ticket gives you access to the recording forever! Tickets are just $7 and you can buy them here.

The Blogcademy Live Q&A
Wednesday, March 27th, 2013
1pm PST / 4pm EST

When it comes to your questions, you can either ask your them during the livestream, or you can tweet or email us them beforehand. We will try to answer as many of them as possible in the hour we have together but it will be first come, first served.

Goodie Bag Giveaway

We’ll also be giving away a coveted Blogcademy tote bag stuffed full of goodies to one lucky livestream viewer! Some of the treats inside include Crown and Glory ears, goodies from the IF Ladies, Head Full of Feathers shoe clips, Moorea Seal jewelry and a copy of the official Blogcademy workshop magazine. Everyone who purchases a ticket is automatically entered!

Whew, that was long!
I’m looking forward to seeing you on the road! Let’s take your blog to the next level in 2013!

Blog Log #1: Features and Finding a Balance

Blog Log


Photo by Shell de Mar

Due in part to the launch of The Blogcademy, I’ve been getting a lot of blogging-specific questions lately and felt they deserved their own category and column! If you have a blogging question of your own, please send it my way at advice @ nubbytwiglet.com. The following question just hit my inbox:

“What is the balance between topics/features that you like to keep to maintain reader interest (e.g. your lifestyle, thought leadership, career advice, reviews of stuff you come across) and was this balance different when you first started out?”

How to Find Your Balance

When you’re blogging professionally and looking for ways to grow your readership, inevitably the balance question pops up. It goes something like this: “How much should I blog about myself versus more general topics in my niche?” This is important to consider because not everyone who comes across your blog will be interested in your niche. For instance, I’m a graphic designer but if all I posted about was my latest design projects and spouted out design jargon, my following would be a lot smaller because honestly, not everyone gives a hoot about design. And, I would get incredibly bored just posting about one topic day in and day out. I know that not all of my readers care about my profession but some may be interested in personal style, business and career advice, life in Portland and cool links I’ve gathered for the week.

While it’s important to have a defined niche that your content revolves around, if you wind your blog too tightly around a singular subject, it can become very dry and insular. Always use your niche as a guide — think of it as a bull’s eye in the middle of a dart board. But then, throw some darts a little further outside of the center. How can you add more depth to your content? What else do you have to offer?

The general consensus I’ve heard time and again is that people first visit a blog because of the niche but stick around for the blogger. We click in because a post intrigues us. But, why do we keep returning? For the personality! And as bloggers, we’re not all one-dimensional. While a lot of us have careers we love, families we love and so on, there’s still more to life. We all have places we love to visit. Favorite restaurants. Idols who inspired us to become who we are. Books and movies that move us. Other bloggers we admire. Living spaces we’re constantly revamping. As bloggers, by sharing what we are passionate about, we become more relatable and way less one-dimensional.

Columns I Started and Why

Many of the columns you currently see on my blog week after week have been running for four years strong! Most started because I noticed a gap in my content or was inspired by what I saw other bloggers doing. If you get an idea from another blogger’s column, just remember to give it a unique name and add your own spin!

• I started The Typofiles because as a designer in college back in 2007, typography and editorial design were of particular interest to me and I saw an opportunity to share new things I’d come across with other aspiring creatives. To this day, I mostly scan and photograph the work myself so it has my own spin.

• Link Love began in 2007 because I wanted a space to compile all the rad links I’d come across on the internet that week — it was a chance to share the love and link back to fellow bloggers I admired (I actually became friends with quite a few of them through this column!)

• I started The Week In Pictures in 2008 because I’d been carrying a camera in my purse every day for years and always ended up with piles of awesome, unused photos. Having a place to curate my latest shots every week and share new discoveries meant that I could convey more of my personality on my blog.

• What I Wore launched in 2007 because I’ve always felt that our sartorial choices are just another form of art. And getting dressed should be elevated to just that — it’s a valid creative outlet.

• I started my Advice column in 2008 because other aspiring creatives were writing me, looking for insights into schooling and design and it was a way for me to give back. I was always very open about not being able to afford art school and instead enrolling in community college for my design education. It turned out to be the best educational decision I’ve made and I wanted to let people know that sometimes it’s okay to take the path less traveled when it comes to education and careers.

The Latest & Greatest launched in 2012 because I was constantly inspired by something new, whether it was a specific color or fashion trend and thought it would be cool to share that wavelength through simple visual curations.

I wanted to share this list to encourage you to think about drawing from your own interests for your columns. Don’t over think it — not every column needs to be groundbreaking. Some columns will develop naturally as you continue blogging while others may be created to fill a specific need. Listen to your readers — they’re not afraid to let you know what they want to see more of! But also, listen to your gut. Some columns may not be the most popular but maybe they’re a personal outlet that keep you inspired to keep on blogging. The key is to strike that balance!

Column Inspiration

If you’re looking for even more column inspiration, here are some of my favorite series I follow and love:

1. Gala Darling’s weekly gratitude list, Things I Love Thursday. 2. The super crafty Make It column by Design Love Fest. 3. Need Read Greed on Jane Reaction. 4. Friday Link Pack by Swiss Miss. 5. Be Free, Lance by Breanna Rose. 6. Door Sixteen’s Yeah, I Could Live There. 7. Launched! by Pugly Pixel. 8. Since You Asked by Cary Tennis.

And, if you’re thirsty for even more blogging-specific content, Gala just started a fantastic multi-part series!

It’s your turn!

What are some of your favorite columns?
Were some of your most popular columns a happy accident or did you develop them to fill a hole in your content?

View more of the Blog Log series here.

Advice #52: Does Blogging & Self-Promotion Make Me Vain?




Hello, I’m wondering if you ever struggle with vanity. To run a blog like your own calls for a great deal of what they call shameless self promotion and self preoccupation. I am basically very generous person and I have a thirst to serve others with my presentation skills and other solution-driven aspects of my personality. The biggest struggle I’m trying to get over is allowing my own brand to be the outlet of all my creative gifts. It’s so hard because it feels so vain to me. I was just wondering if you’ve ever struggled with this?

I used to feel this way as well, so strongly in fact that I was afraid to start a blog on my own domain. It tripped me up for a long time but one conversation changed all that.

From 2001 to 2007, I blogged on Live Journal. Around 2007, I became more aware of my friends (including Gala) making the leap from Live Journal to their own domains. I liked what I saw but I wasn’t sure that was a good move for me. I had the mindset that if I wanted to be taken seriously as a designer, my website should feature only my portfolio. If I shared the rest of who I was, including photos and insights into what I was wearing, were I lived and what I did outside of designing, it would deflect from my work.

But I naturally like to share. And I’m more than just my job — I have other interests. Why should you or I feel shame in sharing what we like?

My turning point came during the Summer of 2007 when I was on a trip to LA. I met up with Star and spilled my worries out at a Coffee Bean in Hollywood. She assured me that things were quickly changing — sure, the established designers didn’t need to blog, they were already established! But the up and comers could benefit from social media and I should just go for it. Trust me, I was still scared but I just did it. A month after that fateful talk, my blog went live.

The shift from that decision happened fast. Within my first year of blogging, I was being approached by clients including Forever 21 and receiving multiple freelance inquiries a week. Sometimes, I still felt unsure though. I’m a pretty humble, modest person and putting myself out there day in and day out felt tiring at times. There were definitely days when I just wanted to design and go about my business and not be bothered! But I knew that if I quit, rebuilding momentum would be incredibly hard. So I kept on and I’m so thankful I did.

Blogging isn’t easy. Designers by nature tend to lurk in the shadows. I’ve never wanted to dance, act, sing or be in the mainstream spotlight. I’ve just wanted to be the best designer and blogger I could be. And if putting myself out there helps to support my business but even more importantly helps me connect with other creatives, I’ll continue to do so.

With blogging, there’s occasionally some bad mixed in with the good but overall, I wouldn’t change a thing. The friends I’ve made, the places I’ve gotten to travel and the thoughts, images and insights I’ve gotten to share with you, the readers, are priceless in a way. Blogging has made my life much more full and given me much needed structure.

Think of your brand this way: if you don’t believe in it, nobody else will. People are always going to judge you no matter what, whether you choose to put yourself out there or not. It’s human nature. Remember that truly successful people are fearless and promote what they value and believe in, even if that’s their own brand. That’s your choice and yours alone.

The Blogcademy 01: New York City Recap

the blogcademy 01 new york city

Over the weekend of October 20th, Gala, Kat and I joined forces to teach the first edition of our workshop, The Blogcademy in New York. To say that it was a life-changing experience is a huge understatement…we’re still buzzing about it!

the blogcademy 01 new york city

“The Blogcademy was so much more than a blogging workshop. All weekend I was surrounded by my 30 classmates who all proved to me that no matter where you are headed in life with ambition, drive and a kick ass attitude you will end up where you want to be. As soon as I got off the elevator on the first day, I could just feel the positive energy radiating from the classroom.” —Liz Davis

the blogcademy 01 new york city

The nervous excitement we felt as we opened the door on the first day is something I’ll never forget.

The Backstory

Individually, Kat, Gala and I had each wanted to do workshops for the last few years. After meeting in Vegas back in February, we realized that we’d be stronger as a trio and in the months that followed, we got to work on building out our ideal blogging workshop. We’d each been to many blogging events but always left feeling like they could be more specialized and hands-on. We wanted The Blogcademy to feature solid strategy and insight focused on building compelling content while demonstrating what it really takes to create a successful blog from the ground up.

the blogcademy 01 new york city

Building out a workshop in a few short months wasn’t an easy task but it was worth every second of effort. You prepare for a new venture the very best you can but there are always those moments when life just happens. Behind the scenes, the goodie bags were bigger and heavier than we expected (thank god our cab driver helped us load and haul them in his trunk), the projector cord was missing an hour before show time and the couch quite suddenly collapsed…we sure got a good laugh afterwards! When that launch day arrives, you just have to go for it and realize that though things will never be perfect, what matters is that you give it your all.

the blogcademy 01 new york city

the blogcademy 01 new york city

My main focus at The Blogcademy was in branding: I shared two personal case studies as well as examples of documents I think every blogger and small business owner should consider. Thinking back to when I began blogging in 2001, I remember how long it took me to piece all this information together. I wanted the attendees to pick up all these insights that took me a decade to learn in a few short hours — I always say that knowledge is power and was important for me to take the secrecy out of what goes into building a successful blog.

the blogcademy 01 new york city

We invited along special guest Veronica Varlow for the fun. She is such an amazing, inspiring woman as well as a wonderful friend and client (her media kit is still a personal favorite of mine. Ooh la la!)

the blogcademy 01 new york city

Out of pure excitement, Gala and I couldn’t seem to keep our composure. Award-winning wedding photographer Lisa Devlin was along for the ride, snapping every moment.

Decor Sponsors

the blogcademy 01 new york city

• A huge thank you to Everly Lane for the turquoise tassels and Peach Blossom for the balloons, striped straws, fans and pom-poms. All these color-coordinated details really made the space come alive.

Goodie Bag Sponsors

the blogcademy 01 new york city

• The amazing letterpress graduation certificates were printed for us by A Fine Press!

• We couldn’t get enough of the wonderful Alphabet Bags who supplied tote bags to stash the goodies in.

• Crown & Glory provided sparkly hair bows which were a huge hit (and they gifted me with those amazing glitter bunny ears)!

• Lisa Devlin was not only a guest speaker but also gave away her awesome Devlin Photos CD of Photoshop actions.

• Finest Imaginary kindly sent along custom Moleskine notebooks & heart rings. So cute!

• Garden Apothecary shared awesome vanilla body scrubs. Love!

• Miss Anastasia provided amazing smelling perfume — I actually designed the logo and packaging which I will be sharing at a later date!

• Our dear friend Molly Crabapple provided super fun activity books — perfect for the plane ride home!

• Sugarpill sent along their trademark bright, highly-pigmented eye-shadows.

• Twinkie Chan totally outdid herself with the handmade Blogcademy coffee cozies!

Food & Drink Sponsors

the blogcademy 01 new york city

Thank you to Paige Wilcox of Blogads for providing valuable insights into what it’s like working with an ad network AND for providing the spread of food. With the busy days, it was nice to have snacks right at our fingertips.

And on day two, Jessica of Storyboard Wedding arrived with 10 bottles of bubbly for our after-party. Thank you, Jessica!

Attendee Reviews of The Blogcademy

1. The Fete Blog 2. Me and My Ego 3. Me and My Ego (part two!) 4. The Alchemy of Hustle 5. Condiments on a City Life 6. Little Bear in a Big World 7. Eldy’s Pocket 8. Burnett’s Boards 9. Danger Dame 10. Andrea Jaggs 10. Get Your Green On 11. Intertitles 12. Work Life Passion 13. Rubies & Ribbon 14. City Girls Knows 15. Reverie Time 16. 128 John St 17. The Girl Who Knows 18. Bitchless Bride.

the blogcademy 01 new york city

Gala got into the spirit of handing out pins and the fab letterpress certificates at the end of class.

“I learnt SO much. I can’t even begin to talk about it, because it’s all still churning round my mind, refusing to settle so I can decide where to begin applying those lessons. But even better than that, I had the most amazing time. Being surrounded by an international community of unbridled talent is where I want to be all.the.time.” —Hayley Judd

the blogcademy 01 new york city

In Closing

I want to extend a huge, heartfelt thank you to our 30 students who believed in us on this maiden voyage, our sponsors for delivering the best goodie bags I’ve ever seen and to Kat & Gala for joining me on this wild ride. I believe in the power of building a community and working as a team more than ever. It is possible to pull off those crazy ideas. The difference between dreams and reality comes down to setting goals and putting plans into motion with firm deadlines. If we can do it, so can you. If you’re interested in attending a future session of The Blogcademy, more dates will be announced on November 14th. And thanks again for following along with us on this crazy, magical adventure!

*All photos are by Devlin Photos. Thanks, Lisa!

Choosing Your Blogging Master Minds

Blogging is a constant learning process. At some point, you may be asking yourself which niche topics you should focus your energy on, what columns to feature and whether or not you should embrace advertising. It’s nearly impossible to have an answer to every situation that arises, especially since many in blogging are highly subjective. So, how do you figure out what to do?

You could spend all of your free time conducting research, but there’s a much more efficient way to acquire the knowledge that you’re in search of. In Napoleon Hill’s classic self help & business book, Think and Grow Rich, one of the core principles of success revolves around the power of the Master Mind.

nubby twiglet blogging master mind

The Master Mind is defined as:

The coordination of knowledge and effort, in spirit of harmony, between two or more people, for the attainment of a definite purpose.

How does this relate to blogging? If you want to be a successful blogger (measurable in your own terms), surround yourself with other successful bloggers that you admire and trust. Ask yourself: Who has a vast knowledge base in areas that you want to learn more about? Who has a writing style that you admire? Who do you think that you could get along with in real life? Who would be willing to help you succeed, no matter what?

nubby twiglet blogging master mind

There are two characteristics of the Master Mind principle, as outlined in Think & Grow Rich:

a. Economic: Economic advantages can be created by any blogger who surrounds themselves with others who are willing to lend advice and contribute to their ventures.

b. Psychic: This principle is harder to comprehend, but Hill says: “No two minds ever come together without, thereby, creating a third, invisible, intangible force which may be likened to a third mind.” When a group of individuals combine for a definite purpose, their increased energy becomes available to everyone that is a part of that group. When the minds of compatible bloggers connect in harmony, the sky’s the limit!

nubby twiglet blogging master mind

nubby twiglet blogging master mind

Master Minds: Star St. Germain, Dave Allen and Gala Darling

Choosing your group of Master Minds is of great importance, so do so carefully and with much consideration. I’m lucky that mine formed very organically. My three blogging Master Minds are:

1. Star St. Germain: I have this blog thanks to Star! When we met up in LA during the summer of 2007, she encouraged me to trade in my standard website for a blog. I wasn’t so sure that it was a good idea to be so public about what I was doing. Don’t some of the best graphic designers retain a bit of mystery?! But, when it comes to online trends, Star is usually right on. I’m so glad that I took her advice. It pays to have tech-savvy friends!

2. Dave Allen: When I first started interning at Nemo in the fall of 2007, one of my school assignments was to interview someone in the design industry. I knew that Dave ran a popular blog and since mine was fairly new, it made sense to get some tips and feedback. That initial interview taught me a lot (Dave knows a ton about technology and social media) and eventually, I began writing for one of the Nemo blogs, Social Cache. Blogging is now a part of my job, thanks to Dave!

3. Gala Darling: Gala loves blogging (it’s her full-time job) and she’s a Virgo (major extra bonus points). It’s nice to have a friend who’s just as comfortable attending blogging conventions as she is cruising through the Balenciaga boutique. We travel well together and she always answers my barrage of blogging-related questions. Blogging soul mates? Most likely!

nubby twiglet blogging master mind

Do you already have a group of Master Minds that are helping you to reach your blogging goals? In a perfect world, who would you add to your group?

The Triple Threat: Personality, Branding and Blogging

Find a way to humanize your brand, use your personality, and take your brand
from good to great. -Guy Kawasaki

Do you envision your blog as a brand? If you do, try embracing the concept of brand personality. To understand what brand personality is, envision your brand as if it were a person. It would have values, beliefs and interests. These attributes are what would make it unique.

Groundbreaking package designer Walter Landor felt that everything you project into the world goes toward creating your brand. Each little piece is of equal importance, equal weight, and has to be appropriate to the audience it is reaching or the message that it is trying to promote.

The energy that you put out on your blog will be directly related to what you receive in return. Since your blog is a brand and you are the central driving force behind developing its personality, it is further defined by every action you take and every post that you create.

1. Determine what your goals are. These goals will pull you through the tough times, give you a focus and ultimately, a way to measure your success. I prefer defined goals that I can actually measure such as reaching a specific rank on Technorati every six months, gaining a certain level of traffic every year, posting a set number of articles to my blog each week, and so on. Without any gray area, it’s much easier to see if you’re hitting the mark.

2. Find out what your readers want and need. How does your brand fit into their life? The best way to determine your reader’s needs is to ask them. Develop a direct connection between your blog and its readers. Do some old fashioned research, whether it’s through polling, emails or a survey post. As an incentive, run a contest.

3. Clearly communicate your blog’s personality. This can be facilitated through being trustworthy, relaible, developing a unique slogan and having a memorable blogging voice.

Marketing has become a mass-produced commodity that lacks authenticity. Our saturation point has been reached and the old rules no longer work. Though used mostly for products and services, branding can also be applied to people. The key to developing an authentic brand is to be true to who you are and to follow your own, unique path. This individuality is the one thing that you can claim as yours. Though others may try to impersonate it along the way, it’s usually fairly easy to spot the original voice among them. Give some thought to the one thing that makes your brand unique, the one attribute that no one can take away from you. This is where you should focus your energy.

The characteristic that many of the most successful blogs share is that people are following the BLOGGER, not the BLOG. A blog’s theme can be replicated, but the personality behind it cannot. There may been hundreds, if not thousands of blogs in a saturated niche. So ask yourself, why do you repeatedly go back to the same blogs when you can probably get the same information from another site?

Gala Darling, a pink-haired force of positivity

Gala Darling’s consistent voice and unwavering positivity, Heather Armstrong’s sarcastic tone and over-the-top stories and Jane’s jaw-droppingly original styling are all examples of unique, immediately recognizable characteristics. Notice that I didn’t refer to their respective project names of iCiNG, dooce, or Sea of Shoes. What these bloggers do can stand on its own, period.

As Tom Dorresteijn notes, “The concept of brand personality combines inside-out and outside-in; identity and image. A personality has its roots in the identity but is strongly externally focused. It is not ‘be who your are’. Personality is: Become who you should be.”

If your blog was a living, breathing person, what adjectives would you use to describe it?

The world belongs to those who stand out, stand up and stand for or against a cause which they can strongly defend, those who can talk crowd and keep their virtues or walk with kings and not lose the common touch – their identity. An independent mind is a frontier of change in the world. -Tayo Korede

Make your brand come alive. Give it a personality that jumps off the page. Strive to make your readers’ experiences memorable. Once you establish a level of quality on your blog, never look back.

What is your blog about?
What characteristics make it unique?
How do you plan on taking it to the next level?

Do You Consider Yourself a Blogger?

If you run a blog, do you consider yourself a blogger? Or, do you feel like the term is too limiting when describing what you do?

Last week, Dave Allen and I got into a discussion about the term ‘blogger’ (a contraction of the words web and log). I wondered, is it still considered cool and relevant? Or, has it lost some of its appeal now that everyone’s doing it?

Even though there are over 110 million blogs in existence, Dave mentioned that since many people still don’t know the difference between a blog and a website, the label ‘blogger’ can be confusing. Many times, if you ask someone if they read blogs, they’ll reply no. But, after some quizzing, they’ll admit that they do read blogs…they just didn’t realize what these sites were called.

During the time my site has been live, I’ve used the term blogger to describe what I do without much thought. My main career is in graphic design and I simply use my blog as a way share my work and thoughts with others. My frequent postings about design, style and marketing could get tricky and convoluted in another format, but a blog with categories and tags makes finding related subject matter a cinch. Blogging is simply my chosen medium of communication.

Some people like Problogger’s Darren Rowse are inching away using the term blogger because they claim that it can be too limiting.

Sometimes, writers are especially sensitive to being categorized as just bloggers and it’s easy to see why. Since bloggers are a dime a dozen, the term can be viewed as downplaying a writer’s talent and craft.

Though, as Mark Glaser points out, some formerly separate worlds have started merging over the last few years:

The time-worn debate of Bloggers vs. Journalists has finally run its course. For years, traditional journalists scoffed at bloggers as pajama-wearing screamers, while bloggers have pointed to MSM (mainstream media) as secretly biased and obsolete. While the extremists in this argument have had the stage shouting at each other loudly, what has happened quietly in the background has received less attention: Mainstream media reporters have started blogging in droves, while larger blog operations have hired seasoned reporters and focused on doing traditional journalism.

On the other side of the argument, categorizing oneself squarely in the blogger camp can make the discussion of what you do for a living less taxing. Entrepreneur Kevin Muldoon relays a common experience:

One of the things I have found about working through the web is my inability to correctly give myself a title, ie. a name which explains what I do for a living. Lots of people online seem to be using the term ‘Entrepreneur’ but I really hate it, it’s kinda pompous in my opinion. With blogging taking up most of my time now I am more than happy to use the title ‘Blogger.’

The blogger label is hip and cool now, but where will it be in five years? Will it still have any merit? Will using a different term really make a difference in how you’re perceived by your audience?

Blogging will probably always exist in one form or another. It’s not surprising that there are over 175,000 new blogs popping up every day. Blogging is an easy way to connect with a much larger audience while investing very little upfront. And, because of this, the number of blogs will continue to grow, whether a niche is already saturated or not. The appeal of sharing your views with the world and receiving instantaneous feedback is highly seductive.

In reality, the people reading your blog probably don’t care what your title is. They are visiting your site regularly because it offers a perceived value. Whether you’re a writer, an information architect, a web publisher, a content developer or just a plain old blogger, what really matters is that your readers love what you’re doing.

Do you consider yourself a blogger?