Category Archives: Typography

The Typofiles #104: Interview Magazine



After picking up the occasional issue of Interview Magazine, I finally broke down and subscribed because it’s consistently beautifully designed and the mix of content is always compelling. Part of this shift over the last few years is in no doubt due to Fabien Baron being the editorial director. I’ve been a long time admirer of his work and it’s no surprise that he’s turned Interview around considering that in the last 20 years, he’s also revamped five other magazines including Italian Vogue and Harper’s Bazaar.

His use of white space is one of the reasons his work stands out and probably influenced by the fact that his dad was a Parisian newspaper designer. Regarding his take on Interview, Baron says, “People buy into personality. And you need to be bolder.”



I found this graphic on the Interview site — it’s brimming with a distinctly Baron-esque look; have you checked it out?


The Typofiles #75: I Love Avant Garde


magazine typofiles typography


Gingko Press just sent me a copy of I Love Avant Garde, a book from Victionary’s I Love Type series and I thought I’d share. Of the title, Gingko says that “each book in the I Love Type series highlights a single typeface and its prevalence in the design community. This narrow focus lends itself to an in-depth study of each typeface — how the same font can be altered to create different moods and generate an entirely original effect.”


magazine typofiles typography


Avant Garde was originally designed by Herb Lubalin as a logo but later became a full typeface. One of my personal favorites, here are some examples of Avant Garde in use that I found particularly compelling.


magazine typofiles typography

magazine typofiles typography

magazine typofiles typography

magazine typofiles typography


Overall, I found the book to be really thorough and though I own a decent library of other design books (and read a huge number of design blogs), I would say that half of the projects were completely new to me. I appreciate the singular focus of one typeface because it really helps you grasp the possibilities when you see hundreds of hugely varied design executions. I’ve been a huge fan of Victionary’s titles for years so I am perhaps a bit biased but still, I was pleasantly surprised at the print quality, variety and layouts of this particular title. And, the hot pink edging on all of the pages is an extra special bonus.


Typography Notebook




As creatives, something we all struggle with at times is staying organized. Let’s face it: there’s so much stuff out there. Magazines, books, blogs, catalogs, fonts and images galore. It’s enough to make anyone’s head spin.



There’s always the thrill of finding an image that strikes your imagination. For me, it’s been much easier to keep my digital content organized — I keep neatly labeled folders tucked away in a designated area on my desktop and sort through these files about once a month.



But, what about real life? I read a lot of magazines and find amazing type everywhere I look. Instead of keeping these images loose (and just waiting to get lost), I began gluing them into an inexpensive Muji notebook that I deemed my ‘Typography Notebook’ about two years ago. Now, when I need to locate an image, I can quickly flip through instead of digging through piles of clippings.



My overall objective is to group similar colors, patterns or other visual cues so that an image can be found with little effort. I find that this same method has worked well for other themed notebooks to keep my various interests nice and neat including interior design and architecture ( Decor Notebook) and fashion-related imagery (Fashion Notebook).



Readers: How do you choose to keep your ‘real life’ imagery organized? Any tips or secrets that you can share with the rest of us?




The Typofiles #66: W Magazine // Black Arts


w magazine typofiles typography

w magazine typofiles typography


This page was an intro to a W Magazine fashion spread last year — I became slightly obsessed with it at the time and had it pinned above my desk for many months. I really like the use of Helvetica paired with the op-art graphic. It’s so very reminiscent of a vintage Swiss poster design and I am Swiss-obsessed so there you go. If this was a contract of some kind, I would sign my name (in blood) without even reading the fine print — I like the looks of it that much.

The entire set of The Typofiles can be viewed here.


The Typofiles #65: Gaga for Elle and Senso for Solestruck


lady gaga elle cover


Sometimes adding type diagonally to a simple layout adds a fresh spin. I had completely forgotten about this cover that only subscribers to U.S. Elle received until last night when I was was searching for the new Rihanna cover (which also features some tilted type).

In a way, it reminds me slightly of the first landing page I designed for Solestruck last month when they were launching Senso, an Australian brand of shoes they are selling exclusively in the U.S.


lady gaga elle cover


Here are two more of my favorites (without any rotation):

lady gaga elle cover

lady gaga elle cover


The entire set of The Typofiles can be viewed here.

P.S. My newest campaign for Solestruck just went live and it’s so twisted and funny. I was basically sent a pile of photos featuring half-naked people, Senso shoes and a bunny head. The whole time I was staring at them, all I could think of was, “Ohhhhhhh Senssssssooooo!” Haha. Here are a few of the results.


The Typofiles #64: Maidenform


maidenform i dreamed


Perhaps the longest running print ad campaign in history (1949 to 1969), Maidenform bras were featured alongside the tagline “I Dreamed I….in my Maidenform bra.”

The activities highlighted in the campaign were fairly ordinary (at least in the beginning), but the accompanying imagery was much more intriguing. My favorite ad from this epic series is “I dreamed I was a private eye in my Maidenform Bra.” It’s got a graphic, pop sensibility — and the dangling handcuffs are a nice touch!

The entire set of The Typofiles can be viewed here.