Monthly Archives: February 2009

The Week in Pictures: 2.27.09

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

Hawaii has been amazing…sometimes pictures are the only way to describe a vacation that has included lounging on Waikiki Beach, visiting the Aloha Tower, wandering along nearly deserted beaches lining the North Shore, sitting streetside at night people watching, discovering a Buddhist temple tucked into a mountainside in the middle of a cemetery, snapping photos of retro typography, hitting happy hour at Moose McGillycuddy’s and sipping massive fruity drinks, chillin’ with Aussie friends and laughing into the morning hours with Lee Z, shopping late into the night, getting cute phone calls from my pink haired wifey, walking so much around the city that blisters appeared, seeing a black swan for the first time, getting sunburned and hoping that I didn’t wake up as a lizard person, having an impromptu picnic at an empty beach with 40 mile per hour winds & absorbing sights and scenery that are impossible to find anywhere else.

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography

week in pictures nubby twiglet typography




What I Wore: 2.26.09

Hawaii has been pretty awesome so far. I spent most of yesterday along Waikiki beach and will be posting The Week in Pictures later this evening since I’m off to the North Shore right now. Fish tacos and running into the salty ocean await!

What I Wore:

White snap-front dress, Vintage
Rainbow belt, was my Grandma’s
Hotel Key necklace, Vintage
Heels, Zinda
Purse, Miu Miu




Link Love: 2.26.08



1. The Dangers of Personal Branding is a good read. It has many valid points, but in the end I think it’s still important to do what you think is right.

2. Storefront: The Disappearing Facade of New York is “a visual guide to New York City’s timeworn storefronts, a collection of powerful images that capture the neighborhood spirit, familiarity, comfort and warmth that these shops once embodied.”

3. The LA Times article Conspicuous Thrift makes an interesting argument that the rich need to keep on spending to keep things moving along…otherwise we’re all in serious trouble.

4. David Airey explains the difference between agencies and freelancers.

5. LOVE magazine now has a website. Click to view some awesome content (and the rest of the very bare Beth Ditto pictures). Oh, they also have a blog, too!

6. Hands down, the Chandelier Creative Ad Agency in New York has THE coolest office EVER (via verhext).

7. Mickey Rourke is my new hero. Anyone who gives an acceptance speech over six minutes long and thanks a deceased dog, the Santa Monica Police Dept. and a woman named ‘Gap Tooth’ deserves a standing ovation! I love it when someone throws caution to the wind and keeps it real. He’s the first person I’d want to hang out with if I was in Miami!

8. Wow, that was fast! Tropicana has reverted back to its old packaging. I actually didn’t mind the new look, but I’m a fan of clean design with sans serif typefaces. Oh well. Now, if only Pepsi would take the hint and follow suit.

9. New York Magazine investigates the deteriorating retail climate and wonders what it will take for small businesses, shops and restaurants to survive (via bits and bobbins).

10. In The Case Against Thrift, Judith Levine argues that the results of the economic downturn include some unsavory findings (such as people boiling and reusing dental floss! Yuck.)

11. The 50 Dollar Logo Experiment is beyond funny in part because the resulting logos are so bad!




Advice #19: Developing an Art Series & Choosing Work for Shows

When putting an art show together, how do you chose which pieces you should put in and how they all go together? I’m having a hard time of it!

When viewing gallery-based art shows, you’ll notice that the featured work is usually grouped together in some manner whether that be by genre, subject, medium or color palette.

A body of work is a collection of pieces that represent an artist’s style or techniques. There tends to be a common characteristic that pulls the work together. As an example, my work is usually collage-based and composed on a bare wood surface with a resin finish.


Work from the Black & White Graphic Insight series, 2008

If you’re interested in seeking gallery representation, most curators will expect that you’ve developed a minimum of 15 to 20 pieces that demonstrate your skill and style, but I usually aim for closer to 30. Sticking to a consistent vision for the entire series may seem contrary to what being an artist is about (i.e. freedom of creativity and expression) but it announces to the art world that you have developed a focus and can carry it out to completion. Also, as you move along, try envisioning how your work will look hanging together.

When you’re starting out, sticking to a specific style may seem boring at first, but if you’re looking for representation, a gallery wants to see consistency. If you get signed and show up with illustrations of women painted with oils one month, screen printed rock posters the next and landscapes in watercolors shortly thereafter, the curator is going to think that you’ve completely lost your mind.


Keep a theme and format in mind when developing a series.

As you develop your style and begin to build a following, people should have a general idea of what to expect as they come back for more of your work. This is not in any way suggesting that all of your work should look the same; that would be boring! Rather, these general guidelines are more of a friendly reminder as you dive into the creative process.

There is no right or wrong answer when considering what order to hang your work, but try to consider contrast or unity. Visualize how you’d like the show to flow from beginning to end and in which order the patron will be viewing it.


Solo Show at Nemo HQ, 2008

Once you’ve hung your work don’t forget to leave room for an artist statement. Most often it is placed at the beginning of the exhibit so that the audience can gain a better understanding of the context behind the work before viewing it on a more detailed scale.

Since fine art is such a personal exploration, the rules aren’t set in stone but rather a general consensus to get you going. And, it should be noted that if you plan to make art for personal pleasure and not for consumption on the gallery circuit, then feel free to throw caution to the wind!




What I Wore: 2.21.09

After mentioning German restaurants and lederhosen yesterday, I was inspired to pull out my Bavarian best! I am a huge fan of lederhosen because I think that they’re much more stylish than regular shorts (and much warmer)! I know that they’re traditionally worn by boys and men, but why should they have all the fun?!

What I Wore:

Vintage lederhosen, gift from Dad
Sweater, Old Navy
Scarf, F21
Purse, Miu Miu
Wedges, Dries Van Noten